Joie
*Junior Filmmaker. Art Director Aspirant. Insane. Young*
Joie
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"I really buy into the idea that practice is the most important thing for getting better at something, and I want to be a better filmmaker. The more I can do it, the more I can develop the skills I want to have."

Joe Swanberg

We talked to the American indie auteur about Happy Christmas and his unique working methods

(via tribecafilm)
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itsemmabell:

Pipilotti Rist at her most exquiste….. cream of the crop…. ‘Pepperminta’.

Such a nice movie 😜
itsemmabell:

Pipilotti Rist at her most exquiste….. cream of the crop…. ‘Pepperminta’.

Such a nice movie 😜
itsemmabell:

Pipilotti Rist at her most exquiste….. cream of the crop…. ‘Pepperminta’.

Such a nice movie 😜
itsemmabell:

Pipilotti Rist at her most exquiste….. cream of the crop…. ‘Pepperminta’.

Such a nice movie 😜
itsemmabell:

Pipilotti Rist at her most exquiste….. cream of the crop…. ‘Pepperminta’.

Such a nice movie 😜
itsemmabell:

Pipilotti Rist at her most exquiste….. cream of the crop…. ‘Pepperminta’.

Such a nice movie 😜
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People are reblogging some of my posts that I forgot I even posted!
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pixography:

Alexandra Manukyan ~ "White Series"
The faded backgrounds portray connection and disconnection of the subject with her background. It’s as if the background physically erases the personal history of the heroine. Her painting, “A Ring of Endless Light” embraces this ideology with a solitary woman staring out from the blurred white backdrop upon the canvas. Bright burning candles spill wax onto her pale skin. 
Alexandra describes her work: “I depict the psychological condition of the characters …while candles represent burnt out feelings, and dreams that are melting away.”  <source>
pixography:

Alexandra Manukyan ~ "White Series"
The faded backgrounds portray connection and disconnection of the subject with her background. It’s as if the background physically erases the personal history of the heroine. Her painting, “A Ring of Endless Light” embraces this ideology with a solitary woman staring out from the blurred white backdrop upon the canvas. Bright burning candles spill wax onto her pale skin. 
Alexandra describes her work: “I depict the psychological condition of the characters …while candles represent burnt out feelings, and dreams that are melting away.”  <source>
pixography:

Alexandra Manukyan ~ "White Series"
The faded backgrounds portray connection and disconnection of the subject with her background. It’s as if the background physically erases the personal history of the heroine. Her painting, “A Ring of Endless Light” embraces this ideology with a solitary woman staring out from the blurred white backdrop upon the canvas. Bright burning candles spill wax onto her pale skin. 
Alexandra describes her work: “I depict the psychological condition of the characters …while candles represent burnt out feelings, and dreams that are melting away.”  <source>
pixography:

Alexandra Manukyan ~ "White Series"
The faded backgrounds portray connection and disconnection of the subject with her background. It’s as if the background physically erases the personal history of the heroine. Her painting, “A Ring of Endless Light” embraces this ideology with a solitary woman staring out from the blurred white backdrop upon the canvas. Bright burning candles spill wax onto her pale skin. 
Alexandra describes her work: “I depict the psychological condition of the characters …while candles represent burnt out feelings, and dreams that are melting away.”  <source>
pixography:

Alexandra Manukyan ~ "White Series"
The faded backgrounds portray connection and disconnection of the subject with her background. It’s as if the background physically erases the personal history of the heroine. Her painting, “A Ring of Endless Light” embraces this ideology with a solitary woman staring out from the blurred white backdrop upon the canvas. Bright burning candles spill wax onto her pale skin. 
Alexandra describes her work: “I depict the psychological condition of the characters …while candles represent burnt out feelings, and dreams that are melting away.”  <source>
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alittletasteofmint:

Details 2
alittletasteofmint:

Details 2
alittletasteofmint:

Details 2
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alittletasteofmint:

Opposite 
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ifpaintingscouldtext:

Guido Reni | Bacchus and Ariadne | 1621
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recycledmoviecostumes:

It is unknown just where exactly this highly detailed and beautifully embroidered early Jacobean style jacket originated. While it is possible that it was made for The New World, where it was first seen in 2005 on Q’orianka Kilcher as Pocahontas, most of the gowns from that film were recycled from earlier films such as Shakespeare In Love or Elizabeth. 
The jacket is seen again in the opening credits of Showtime series The Tudors, most likely on Natalie Dormer as Anne Boleyn, though her face is not shown when we see the jacket. In 2008, it was seen on Esther Nubiola as Diane de Monsoreau in the film La dame de Monsoreau, and then again in 2014 on Alice Sanders as Fleur Baudin in the television show The Musketeers.
Jackets like these can often be seen in portraits from the time period, and several of them still exist today.  A portrait of Dorothy Cary, Viscountess Rochford shows a wonderful example, and an extant jacket in the collection at The Fashion Museum in Bath. is extremely similar to the costume above, right down to the pink ribbons.

Costume Credit: 66272, Gepaepyris,  Katie, Maryellen
E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com
Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest
recycledmoviecostumes:

It is unknown just where exactly this highly detailed and beautifully embroidered early Jacobean style jacket originated. While it is possible that it was made for The New World, where it was first seen in 2005 on Q’orianka Kilcher as Pocahontas, most of the gowns from that film were recycled from earlier films such as Shakespeare In Love or Elizabeth. 
The jacket is seen again in the opening credits of Showtime series The Tudors, most likely on Natalie Dormer as Anne Boleyn, though her face is not shown when we see the jacket. In 2008, it was seen on Esther Nubiola as Diane de Monsoreau in the film La dame de Monsoreau, and then again in 2014 on Alice Sanders as Fleur Baudin in the television show The Musketeers.
Jackets like these can often be seen in portraits from the time period, and several of them still exist today.  A portrait of Dorothy Cary, Viscountess Rochford shows a wonderful example, and an extant jacket in the collection at The Fashion Museum in Bath. is extremely similar to the costume above, right down to the pink ribbons.

Costume Credit: 66272, Gepaepyris,  Katie, Maryellen
E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com
Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest
recycledmoviecostumes:

It is unknown just where exactly this highly detailed and beautifully embroidered early Jacobean style jacket originated. While it is possible that it was made for The New World, where it was first seen in 2005 on Q’orianka Kilcher as Pocahontas, most of the gowns from that film were recycled from earlier films such as Shakespeare In Love or Elizabeth. 
The jacket is seen again in the opening credits of Showtime series The Tudors, most likely on Natalie Dormer as Anne Boleyn, though her face is not shown when we see the jacket. In 2008, it was seen on Esther Nubiola as Diane de Monsoreau in the film La dame de Monsoreau, and then again in 2014 on Alice Sanders as Fleur Baudin in the television show The Musketeers.
Jackets like these can often be seen in portraits from the time period, and several of them still exist today.  A portrait of Dorothy Cary, Viscountess Rochford shows a wonderful example, and an extant jacket in the collection at The Fashion Museum in Bath. is extremely similar to the costume above, right down to the pink ribbons.

Costume Credit: 66272, Gepaepyris,  Katie, Maryellen
E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com
Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest
recycledmoviecostumes:

It is unknown just where exactly this highly detailed and beautifully embroidered early Jacobean style jacket originated. While it is possible that it was made for The New World, where it was first seen in 2005 on Q’orianka Kilcher as Pocahontas, most of the gowns from that film were recycled from earlier films such as Shakespeare In Love or Elizabeth. 
The jacket is seen again in the opening credits of Showtime series The Tudors, most likely on Natalie Dormer as Anne Boleyn, though her face is not shown when we see the jacket. In 2008, it was seen on Esther Nubiola as Diane de Monsoreau in the film La dame de Monsoreau, and then again in 2014 on Alice Sanders as Fleur Baudin in the television show The Musketeers.
Jackets like these can often be seen in portraits from the time period, and several of them still exist today.  A portrait of Dorothy Cary, Viscountess Rochford shows a wonderful example, and an extant jacket in the collection at The Fashion Museum in Bath. is extremely similar to the costume above, right down to the pink ribbons.

Costume Credit: 66272, Gepaepyris,  Katie, Maryellen
E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com
Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest
recycledmoviecostumes:

It is unknown just where exactly this highly detailed and beautifully embroidered early Jacobean style jacket originated. While it is possible that it was made for The New World, where it was first seen in 2005 on Q’orianka Kilcher as Pocahontas, most of the gowns from that film were recycled from earlier films such as Shakespeare In Love or Elizabeth. 
The jacket is seen again in the opening credits of Showtime series The Tudors, most likely on Natalie Dormer as Anne Boleyn, though her face is not shown when we see the jacket. In 2008, it was seen on Esther Nubiola as Diane de Monsoreau in the film La dame de Monsoreau, and then again in 2014 on Alice Sanders as Fleur Baudin in the television show The Musketeers.
Jackets like these can often be seen in portraits from the time period, and several of them still exist today.  A portrait of Dorothy Cary, Viscountess Rochford shows a wonderful example, and an extant jacket in the collection at The Fashion Museum in Bath. is extremely similar to the costume above, right down to the pink ribbons.

Costume Credit: 66272, Gepaepyris,  Katie, Maryellen
E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com
Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest
recycledmoviecostumes:

It is unknown just where exactly this highly detailed and beautifully embroidered early Jacobean style jacket originated. While it is possible that it was made for The New World, where it was first seen in 2005 on Q’orianka Kilcher as Pocahontas, most of the gowns from that film were recycled from earlier films such as Shakespeare In Love or Elizabeth. 
The jacket is seen again in the opening credits of Showtime series The Tudors, most likely on Natalie Dormer as Anne Boleyn, though her face is not shown when we see the jacket. In 2008, it was seen on Esther Nubiola as Diane de Monsoreau in the film La dame de Monsoreau, and then again in 2014 on Alice Sanders as Fleur Baudin in the television show The Musketeers.
Jackets like these can often be seen in portraits from the time period, and several of them still exist today.  A portrait of Dorothy Cary, Viscountess Rochford shows a wonderful example, and an extant jacket in the collection at The Fashion Museum in Bath. is extremely similar to the costume above, right down to the pink ribbons.

Costume Credit: 66272, Gepaepyris,  Katie, Maryellen
E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com
Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest